How To Ignite Your Inspiration At Work


If your work no longer excites and inspires you, then the new book, Find the Fire, is a timely read. And one that will help you rekindle your own inspiration. 

You’ll learn how to:
  • Overcome the common fears of failure, change and criticism.
  • Adopt an open mind and seek out new experiences.
  • Embolden yourself to take more risks.
  • Build upon progress and create momentum.
  • Unleash creativity and produce work you’re proud of.
  • Kick-start learning and growth.
  • Banish perfectionism.
  • Lift your self-confidence and earn respect.
Most important, you’ll find the fire in work that eliminates the common factors that drag people down, such as disconnectedness, fear, inundation, settling and boredom, dwindling self-belief, loss of control, feelings of insignificance, lack of evocation and dearth of creating – all things that sap your energy and optimism. 

One of my favorite parts in the book is the list of nine ways to negate the fear of change.

“Change threatens our sense of stability and robs us of our sense of control,” explains author Scott Mautz.

He teaches you how to:
  1. Turn resistance into resolution.
  2. Believe that you have the competence for change.
  3. Think of change like a software upgrade.
  4. Find your anchor despite the change taking place.
  5. Bring order to unruly change.
  6. Get clear on the case for change.
  7. Get yourself involved in the change.
  8. Have real faith, not blind faith.
My second favorite section covers in depth the 10 ways to overcome the fear of criticism, which are:
  1. Know that anything worth doing attracts admiration and criticism.
  2. Be clairvoyant about avoidance.
  3. Seek improvement, not approval.
  4. Consider the intent of the criticism.
  5. If you can’t control the sting, keep it from swelling.
  6. Decide who gets to criticize you.
  7. Let our elders inspire you.
  8. Get your skeletons out of the closet – getting out in the open the things you most fear getting criticized for.
  9. Recall when criticism helped an outcome.
  10. Stay focused on the conclusion, not the criticism.

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