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How To Thrive Amidst Information Overload

Ross Dawson ’s book,  Thriving On Overload , provides you practical insights and strategies to build a positive relationship with information and excel at work and all your ventures.  Dawson draws on his work as a leading futurist and 25 years of research into the practices that transform a surplus of information into compelling value.  More specifically, he shares simple actionable techniques for staying ahead in an accelerating world and massive amounts of information – for many of us, information overload.  “It’s all about choosing to thrive on overload―rather than being overwhelmed by it,” explains Dawson. “ Thriving on Overload  starts from the premise that who we are, our identities and lives and destiny, are framed by our relationship with information.”  By reading the book and completing the exercises at the end of each chapter, you’ll learn how to develop the  five intertwined powers  that enable extraordinary performance in a world of overload:  Purpose : understanding why yo
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How To Reduce Loneliness Within The Workplace

Here is a book that provides workplace leaders an urgently needed methodology for helping companies to reduce worker loneliness, and it delivers a blueprint for building strong, high-performing workplace teams. The book is,  Connectable: How Leaders Can Move Teams From Isolated To All In , by  Ryan Jenkins  and  Steven Van Cohen .   “72% of workers suffer from loneliness. And, what was once a simmering problem shifted to a crisis when COVID-19 and the sudden transition to remove work isolated workers from each other as never before,” report the authors.   “Loneliness is the absence of connection,” explain the authors. “Loneliness is not defined by the lack of people, because someone can be lonely even while surrounded by others. We require more than the presence of others. We require the presence of others to dream, strategize, and work toward commons goals.”   Furthermore, “workplace loneliness is defined by the distress caused by the perceived inadequacy of quality connection to team

Critical Questions To Ask New Hires

In  Paul Falcone ’s book,  75 Ways For Managers To Hire, Develop And Keep Great Employees , he recommends asking new employees the following questions 30, 60 and 90 days after they were hired:   30-Day One-on-One Follow-Up Questions Why do you think we selected you as an employee? What do you like about the job and the organization so far? What’s been going well? What are the highlights of your experiences so far? Why? Tell me what you don’t understand about your job and about our organization now that you’ve had a month to roll up your sleeves and get your hands dirty. Have you faced any unforeseen surprises since joining us that you weren’t expecting?   60-Day One-on-One Follow-Up Questions Do you have enough, too much or too little time to do your work? Do you have access to the appropriate tools and resources? Do you feel you have been sufficiently trained in all aspects of your job to perform at a high level? How do you see your job relating to the organization’s mission and visio

An Action Plan For Embracing Change

A few months ago brought the new book,   Build For Tomorrow , by   Jason Feifer , Editor in chief of Entrepreneur magazine and host of the podcasts   Build For Tomorrow   and   Problem Solvers .  “My new book is for anyone facing down an uncertain future, as well as a practical guide for every entrepreneur and aspiring entrepreneur,” says Feifer.  Organized around the four phases of change, Feifer shares personal insights and learnings from his interviews with success entrepreneurs and changemakers who have experienced tectonic shifts in work, culture, and life.  The  four phases of change  are: Panic Adapt New Normal Wouldn’t Go Back – When we gain something so new and great that we wouldn’t want to go back to a time before we had it.  “Change is coming. It’s here. It cannot be stopped! And when it comes for us, we really only two choices – to embrace it, or to fight a losing fight,” explains Feifer.  Therefore, Feifer teaches that: When in the Panic phase of change , pause when oth

How To Build A World-Class Culture

“When it comes to culture, one of the most glaring issues is that far too many leaders do not recognize it as one of their greatest competitive advantages,” says Matt Mayberry , author of the new book, Culture Is The Way .   Mayberry, former linebacker for the Chicago Bears and now keynote speaker and global expert in leadership development, culture change, and organizational performance, took the lessons he learned on the field and in the locker room straight to the boardroom.  “Over time, I realized that the same characteristics that distinguish the best football teams are also required to succeed in business,” shares Mayberry. Those characteristics include:   A strong commitment to excellence. An emphasis on teamwork. Practicing like a champion every day. Perseverance in the face of adversity.   Other key lessons from sports coaches include these says Mayberry:   Develop a burning desire to improve culture. Generate and bring positive energy daily. Don’t just manage people,

The Benefits Of When Everyone Leads

It’s only January and the new book, When Everyone Leads , could likely be my pick for the best new leadership book of 2023. It’s that good. There’s still nearly a whole year ahead of us so we’ll see what other books debut. In the meantime, add this book to your must-read list.   You’ll learn that: Leadership is an activity, not a position. Leadership is mobilizing others to make progress on the most important challenges. Leadership is interactive, risky and experimental. Leadership comes in moments. Leadership is always about change.   When Everyone Leads , by Ed O’Malley and Julia Fabris McBride , presents a revolutionary approach to leadership; not based on position or authority, but an activity that anybody can undertake by learning to spot opportunities for improvement and taking the initiative to engage others.   “It can be unfamiliar and uncomfortable, but in a culture where everyone leads, organizations start to make progress on their most difficult problems,” explain t

100 Years Of Business And Leadership Lessons

Last year brought the release of the new book,  HBR At 100 ,  a  commemorative volume featuring the most influential ideas since the inception of the  Harvard Business Review .   As a celebration of the magazine’s   100th anniversary, this new book covers a broad range of management topics, including:   Disruptive Innovation Design Thinking Emotional Intelligence Racial Equality At Work Persuasion Leading With Authenticity Leading Change Communication   When  Harvard Business Review  first rolled off the presses a century ago, it became a welcome showcase of fresh ideas for the relatively new field of business management.   Since then, the magazine has published some of the most influential ideas in the history of modern business, and  HRB At 100 ’s collection of articles highlights many of them.   This is a goldmine of education for both experienced leaders and those new to their leadership role.   Thank you to the book’s publisher for sending me an advance copy of the book.

Don't Spin Your Team In Circles

A manager who can't make a decision or who can't make a timely decision will frustrate his/her employees. Equally bad, a lack of decision will impede the progress of the manager's team. Some managers make endless requests for data as a way to postpone their having to make a decision.  Employees end up spinning in circles , slicing and dicing the information far beyond what is truly needed for the manager to make a decision.  Some managers are simply afraid to make a decision in fear of making a "wrong" decision. These managers don't necessarily request needless data, but simply just never decide.  Successful managers gather the data from their employees, make any truly necessary follow-up requests (probing beyond what their employee may have researched/gathered on their own), and then make their decision...knowing that in virtually all cases most decisions are not black and white "right or "wrong," but are the best decisions made at that time fo

My Best Boss Did This

In their book,  Rapid Realignment , authors  George Labovitz  and  Victor Rosansky , reveal the most common responses from  thousands of managers and workers  when they were asked to think of the best boss they ever had, and then answer the question: " What did that person do to qualify as your best boss ?" And,  those most common responses were : My best boss listened! My best boss backed me up. My best boss trusted me and respected me. My best boss gave me feedback. My best boss left me alone. What else would you add to this list?

How To Harness Your Experiential Intelligence

“Experiential Intelligence provides a new lens from which to view what makes you, you—and what makes your team and organization unique,” says Soren Kaplan , author of the new book, Experiential Intelligence .   Kaplan explains that over 100 years ago, we established IQ (Intelligence Quotient) to predict success. Then we explored Emotional Intelligence (EQ), the theory of multiple intelligences, and mindsets that broaden the definition of smarts.   “Today, Experiential Intelligence ( XQ ) expands our understanding of what's needed to thrive in a disruptive world. While you can't change the past, your unique experiences and stories contain hidden strengths and untapped potential for the future,” explains Kaplan.   Experiential Intelligence is the combination of mindsets, abilities, and know-how gained from your unique life experiences that empowers you to achieve your goals. It allows you to get in touch with the accumulated wisdom and talents you have gained over tim