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How To Be More Strategic

"Today’s business leaders are faced with many challenges: intense competition, increased regulation, and the need for constant innovation. Therefore, it’s imperative that as a business leader you have the essential meta-skill to navigate your business with a thorough understanding of your current situation, vision to see the future destination, and the ability to create the path to reach it,” explains  Rich Horwath , author of the book,  Strategic .  He says that being strategic is to possess insight that leads to advantage. Strategic is the  opposite of unstrategic  that includes:  Wondering aimlessly , lacking direction, getting lost in the weeds.  Doing everything , lacking the discipline to say no, and trying to be all things to all customers, both internally and externally.  Conducting meetings that take conversations down rabbit holes  that cause widespread frustration amongst the members of your group.  Fortunately, the book provides you with the blueprint for navigating th
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Leadership Lessons From Lisa Lutoff-Perlo's Accomplished Career

  Today brings the new and inspiring book, Making Waves , by Lisa Lutof-Perlo . You will follow the impressive career journey of Lutoff-Perlo, from her stories as an ambitious young woman to first women President and CEO of Celebrity Cruises to Vice Chairman for External Affairs at Royal Caribbean Group.   In the book, she reveals how she navigated an extraordinary four-decade journey with boundless energy, quick wit, and the pursuit of excellence in the face of adversity.   At the heart of her vivid stories of triumphs, hardships, and never letting the word “no” dictate her destiny are  essential lessons such as:   The importance of caring deeply for people and putting others first. How to use your superpowers to set yourself apart from other leaders. Why you don’t always need a linear plan—sometimes it can be a long and winding journey. The value of looking at failure and setbacks as success in progress. Why perseverance, resilience and tenacity are critical to achieving succe

How To Harness Your Experiential Intelligence

“Experiential Intelligence provides a new lens from which to view what makes you, you—and what makes your team and organization unique,” says Soren Kaplan , author of the book, Experiential Intelligence . Kaplan explains that over 100 years ago, we established IQ (Intelligence Quotient) to predict success. Then we explored Emotional Intelligence (EQ), the theory of multiple intelligences, and mindsets that broaden the definition of smarts.   “Today,  Experiential Intelligence  ( XQ ) expands our understanding of what's needed to thrive in a disruptive world. While you can't change the past, your unique experiences and stories contain hidden strengths and untapped potential for the future,” explains Kaplan.   Experiential Intelligence is the combination of mindsets, abilities, and know-how  gained from your unique life experiences that empowers you to achieve your goals. It allows you to get in touch with the accumulated wisdom and talents you have gained over time through your

Seven Ways To Be A Collaborative Leader

Edward M. Marshall 's book,  Transforming The Way We Work -- The Power Of The Collaborative Workplace , remains relevant today, more than a decade after Marshall wrote it. Particularly useful is the book's section that teaches readers how to be a collaborative leader . Marshall says that there are  seven different, important roles and responsibilities of collaborative leaders when leading teams , and those leaders should select the appropriate style to meet the team's needs. The seven roles are : The leader as sponsor  -- You provide strategic direction, boundaries and coaching for the team. You also monitor progress and ensure integrity in the team's operating processes. The leader as facilitator  -- You ensure that meetings, team dynamics, and interpersonal relationships function effectively. You also ensure internal coordination of activities among team members. The leader as coach  -- You provide support and guidance and you serve as a sounding board. The leader as

Characteristics Of A Great Vision Statement

Follow this advice, from the authors ( Ron Ricci  and  Carl Wiese ) of the,  Collaboration Imperative , book for  how to create a great vision statement for your team (or company) :  A vivid, idealized and memorable description of a desired outcome. Inspiring, energizing and helpful in creating a mental picture of your target. Based on an “outside-in” perspective—focused on evolving customer needs rather than an insular, status quo mentality. An enduring idea that galvanizes people to get behind something. Compatible with the team’s agreed-upon goals and direction. Something that every team member should be able to recite. Broad enough to be meaningful for the entire duration of the team’s existence.

How To Build A World-Class Workplace Culture

“When it comes to culture, one of the most glaring issues is that far too many leaders do not recognize it as one of their greatest competitive advantages,” says  Matt Mayberry , author of the new book,  Culture Is The Way .   Mayberry, former linebacker for the Chicago Bears and now keynote speaker and global expert in leadership development, culture change, and organizational performance, took the lessons he learned on the field and in the locker room straight to the boardroom.  “Over time, I realized that the same characteristics that distinguish the best football teams are also required to succeed in business,” shares Mayberry. Those characteristics include:   A strong commitment to excellence. An emphasis on teamwork. Practicing like a champion every day. Perseverance in the face of adversity.   Other key lessons from sports coaches include these says Mayberry:   Develop a burning desire to improve culture. Generate and bring positive energy daily. Don’t just  manage  people,  coa

How To Find What You Love And Love What You Do

Do you have a chance to play to your strengths every day? Were you excited to go to work every day last week?   How you answer these two questions will determine if you are more likely to be successful, resilient, and engaged at work – and likely to do something great in your life by taking seriously what you love and expressing it in some sort of productive way.  This is what bestselling author,  Marcus Buckingham , explains in his book,  Love + Work .  “You've long been told to ‘Do what you love,’ shares Buckingham. “Sounds simple, but the real challenge is how to do this in a world not set up to help you. Most of us actually don't know the real truth of what we love—what engages us and makes us thrive—and our workplaces, jobs, schools, even our parents, are focused instead on making us conform. Sadly, no person or system is dedicated to discovering the crucial intersection between what you love to do and how you contribute it to others,” declares Buckingham.  Therefore, the