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Showing posts from June, 2019

Always Follow Through

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Set a good example for your employees and follow through on everything you say you are going to do.
If you promise to get an employee an answer, get it for him or her. If you say you'll send a team member a report, do so. As the Nike campaign/slogan so aptly says, "Just Do It."
Too many leaders don't follow through. Perhaps they get busy. Perhaps they forget. However, following through is critical to keeping your team effective and efficient. And it's necessary for gaining respect from your employees.
Following through also means doing so in a timely fashion. If you take too long to follow through, it's as bad as not following through at all.

Eight Actions To Show You Value Your Employees

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There are eight specific actions business leaders can take to show that they value their employees, according to Andrew Leigh, author of the book, Ethical Leadership -- Creating and Sustaining an Ethical Business Culture.

Those eight actions are: Attention -- Pay attention to what people say to show your interest.Listen -- Make time to hear what colleagues, peers and employees have to say to show you care.Positive Language -- Find words and phrases to show employees they're needed.  Examples are, "We couldn't have accomplished this without you," "That was really useful."Document -- Put praise in writing to increase its impact.  Make clear where the credit belongs.Micro Sessions -- Create two-way communication sessions.Visits -- Schedule visits to teams and work areas.Stories -- Share stories that highlight unusual contributions and provide your personal response to them.Invite -- Ask people to contact you directly with their issues and concerns -- not to by…

How To Be A Good Coach

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Former Verizon Wireless CEO, Denny F. Strigl offers these tips for how to be a good coach to an employee. He explains that good coaches help performers by:
Keeping them focused.Giving them objective, helpful feedback.Acting as a sounding board for new approaches.Identifying blind spots that may be holding the performer back.Reinforcing key values, principles, and behaviors that improve performance.Recognizing positive behavior and performance.Providing encouragement after setbacks and failuresSetting "stretch" goals.Acting as an accountability partner.Strigl believes that some managers fail in their coaching roles because they:
View coaching as babysitting.See coaching as only correcting performance.Don't spend enough time with their employees.Are reluctant to criticize.Have social relationships with their employees.Have a "sink-or-swim" philosophy.Believe coaching is not helpful or meaningful."Coaching may actually save time by preventing extensive retraini…

Learn To Take Risks

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Inspirational leadership wisdom came awhile back from Bahram Akradi, the CEO of Life Time Fitness.
From that health club's monthly fitness magazine, Experience Life, Akradi says: Once we get comfortable in our habitual patterns, we may fail to notice when they have outworn their useful purpose, or when new alternatives might serve us better.Once you've encountered a second way of seeing things, you're more likely to entertain the possibility of a third and fourth way, too.Do something that makes you just a little bit uncomfortable--and that renders you a little more awake.Thanks Akradi for encouraging us to break out from predictability.

Words To Lead By

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Words to lead by:

"It's amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit." - President Harry S. Truman.

"Motivation is the art of getting people to do what you want them to do because they want to do it." - President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

"I not only use all the brains I have, but all I can borrow." - President Woodrow Wilson.

How To Be A Super Boss

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"Superbosses embrace certain practices that good bosses don't, and they do even more of the productive things that good bosses do," says Syney Finkelstein, author of the book, Superbosses: How Exceptional Leaders Master the Flow of Talent.
What's more, according to Finkelstein's findings from ten years of research and two hundred interviews, superbosses focus on identifying promising newcomers, inspiring their best work, and launching them into highly successful careers, while also expanding their own networks and building stronger companies.
Most important, "regenerating the talent pool is the single most important thing any leader can do to survive and prosper," adds Finkelstein.
Sydney Finkelstein
Superbosses also do this: Create master-apprentice relationshipsRely on the cohort effectSay good-bye on good termsAdapt the job or organization to fit the talentTake chances on unconventional talentLook for new talent poolsHire on the sportAccept churn
Finkelste…

Best Leadership Advice From My Career

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Fortunately, most of my career I’ve worked in effective corporate cultures. If I put together the best of each, here is what made those environments effective:

• Leaders led by example on a consistent basis and were willing to roll up their sleeves, particularly during tight deadlines or challenging times.

• Employees clearly understood how what they did made a difference and how their contributions made the organization either more profitable or more effective.

• The workforce included a blend of long-term employees with a rich company, product/service and customer history, employees who had been at the company for five to seven years, and then new hires with a fresh perspective and keen sense of new technologies and techniques. That blend worked best when the mix included virtually all A-players.

• Top managers had a clear, realistic and strategic vision for how the company would grow and compete in the marketplace.

• Employees were challenged and rewarded through growth opportunities, e…

How To Clarify Inconsistencies With An Employee

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If you’re having a difficult time clarifying inconsistencies you are hearing from an employee about a project’s/task’s progress, try asking these questions (or making these statements) the next time you meet with the employee:

•  Here’s what I see. Here’s what I hear you saying.
•  Here’s what we know so far.
•  So let’s see if I’m on track with you…
•  Let’s see where we are…
•  How about we step back from a moment and look at a few different ideas…
•  Did I hear you correctly when you said…?
•  Am I missing something here?

Always be sure you’re on the same page and have the same understanding of the progress being made with your employee’s projects.

Thanks to Jane Murphy for these tips from her book, What Could Happen If You Do Nothing.

Leadership Books To Read This Summer

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Starting to choose which business books you'll read this summer? Here are some leadership books I highly recommend:







Leadership Tip: Wait 24 Hours Before Responding

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As a leader a time will come when you have to write an email, memo or letter to address an issue of great importance or concern to you. Or, perhaps in response to something that displeased you, disappointed you, frustrated you, or upset you.

Write that document. Then, let it sit. Preferably, let it sit for 24 hours.

Then, re-read it. It's almost guaranteed you'll end up tweaking the document. You might add a fact that you accidentally omitted in the heat of the moment the day before. Or, more likely, you'll alter the tone so it will achieve a better response from the document's recipient. You may even decide not to send the document at all, and instead will discuss the matter in person or over the phone with the intended recipient.

Usually, time and circumstances permit you to let your document sit for a day. And when your document sits for a day, you'll end up ultimately crafting a better message.

How To Win Versus Survive

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Jack H. Llewellyn, PhD is a sports psychology consultant who has helped a major league baseball pitcher become a Cy Young Award winner, A NASCAR driver go from number six overall to number one and with the Winston Cup Series Championship, and countless leaders at Fortune 500 companies. Now, he’s written the book, Commonsense Leadership: No-Nonsense Rules for Improving Your MentalGame and Increasing Your Team’s Performance.
This is an excellent book for leaders at any stage in their leadership career. It’s a results-driven guidebook that teaches you how to recover quickly from adversity, thrive on stress, preform on the emotional edge, and create a motivating environment (instead of trying to motivate people).
My favorite chapter is the one titled, Winning versus Surviving. In it, Llewellyn outlines the life factors that can fuel your everyday success. Some of those factors include:
No. 1 – Winners expect to win every day. Your plan as a leader should be based on what you expect to gain i…

Five Cultural Fit Questions For Interviewing The Ideal Candidate

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If you are leading an organization and are the last person to interview a candidate, focus your questions more on trying to see if the person is a cultural fit. Here are a few questions to pose to potential new hires (from the book, Advisory Leadership:
What motivates you?What are you passionate about? (Finding out what people are passionate about and why is a great window into someone's personality.)What are you telling your family/spouse about our company? (This question often takes candidates off guard and results in some often very honest answers.)What did you enjoy most/find most challenging in  your last position? (There are no right or wrong answers, necessarily. This question is a great assessment of the candidate, especially when considering certain roles.)What opportunities do you see for yourself here?

The Critical Years Of Your Professional Life

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A lot has happened since 1997 when Robert L. Dilenschneider wrote, The Critical First Years of your Professional Life. That's why a few years ago he released a new edition of his best-seller. "The book contains all the lessons you'll need to learn about functioning at work," explains Dilenschneider.  His lessons are based on his four decades of experience in the work world, along with research and dozens of interviews with business experts.
The lastest edition of the book is particularly relevant today, because, shares Dilenscheider: Not knowing the ropes puts you at a competitive disadvantage.Times have changed, and there are fewer people in today's workplace willing to help you understand how the world of work operations.Lessons in the book include: You and Your BossesWorking the GrapevineNetworkingMaking Allies of Your EldersImageHaving Influence at Any LevelYour Work and Your Personal LifeAfter a SetbackMentorsFormer Chariman and CEO of Lockhead Martin Corporatio…

How To Prove Your Competence And Win People Over

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When you want to improve your competence and how others view your competence, the book, Convinced: How To Prove Your Competence And Win People Over, by jack Nasher, is your go-to resource.
With the advice in the book you will be able to exhibit your abilities in front of customers, colleagues, and superiors – whether in meetings, presentations, or crucial conversations.
Chapter 1 shows you why competence is the most important single factor for your professional success, according to Nasher.
Chapter 3 shows you how to present good and bad news in the way that is most beneficial to you.
Chapter 5 synthesizes research on the role of speech in projecting an image of expertise and provides tips for speaking like an expert.
Chapter 6 emphasizes the importance of body language that demonstrate competence.
My favorite verbal communication tips for displaying competence that Nasher shares in his book are: Speak a little faster than usual, but clearly and smoothly.Speak somewhat deeper and louder than…