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Showing posts from December, 2019

How To Improve Your Decision Making Skills

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Be sure to check out the book, The Decision Makeoever, by Mike Whitaker. It's a fascinating look at decision making and the importance of decision size and timing.

As you read the book, you'll gain a better understanding of:
The power of decisionsWhy we make bad decisionsHow to deal with bad decisionsHow to deal with regretHow to take control of decision makingHow goals and decisions can help each other Perhaps the most significant part of the book is the author's perspective on goals. "Knowing your goals is the key to making good decisions," says Whitaker. "Because goals and decision-making are so intimately intertwined."
Therefore, he advises that you: Keep a few key goals close: Choice five prime goals and stay focused on them.Decide which goal is top priority and always give it favorable treatment when making decisions.Know that when a decision overlaps a prime goal, it becomes a prime decision. And, prime decisions are to be treated with more care b…

How To Identify And Develop Emerging Talent In Your Company

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From the book, Mastering the Challenges of Leading Change, comes this useful checklist from author H. James Dallas for how to identify and develop emerging talent in your company/organization.

Dallas recommends that each question should be graded on a scale of 1 to 3, with 3 being the best. Use the questions and the scoring for you and your employee to work together toward the highest ratings across the board.
Has the person demonstrated a "getting lost with confidence" mind-set?Does the person communicate with authenticity?Has the person created a strong personal brand that is recognized by colleagues of all levels?Does the person know his or her blind spots and have people watching to prevent him or her from crashing?Is the person getting exposure to executive management?Does the person seek out and seriously consider advice?Is the person building an inclusive team and sponsoring others?Is the person proactive in finding opportunities to initiate and lead change?

Today's Leadership Thought: Celebrate Learning

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Today's leadership thought comes from the new book, Trap Tales, by David M. R. Covey and Stephan M. Mardyks.

"Rejoice and celebrate in the effort, the journey, and the process as much as in the end result. Mistakes are instructive. Learn from them instead of hiding them."

Leading Versus Managing

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Here are some great insights about leading versus managing from Bob Kulhan and his book, Getting To Yes And.

He says, "Leading is not managing. Managing is not leading."

"Managing is taking care of logistical and practical details. Every team-related task needs to be managed to some extent, and the quality of managing can fall anywhere on a spectrum that runs from well-oiled machine to gear-grinding nightmare."

"The real problem arises when anyone confuses the managing of job-specific details with actual leadership. One does not need to be a visionary to qualify as a leader, but leadership does imply vision from a position of oversight."

"Managing is a part of leading, and a great leader can and should be an excellent manager. While a good manager needs to effectively communicate data and details, a good leader communicates on a broader, higher level. A leader drives for results, leads by example, and develops talent."

Finally, he adds that, &q…

Leaving Your Legacy

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Today's leadership thought comes from the new book, Trap Tales, by David M. R. Covey and Stephan M. Mardyks.

"True happiness does not come from possessions. It comes from serving others and making meaningful contributions that benefit other people long after we are gone. It is prioritizing experiences over possessions."

5 Tips For Making An Effective Presentation

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There is lots of good advice in Bob Kulhan's book, Getting To Yes And, One of my favorites is his tips for making a presentation.

Kulhan recommends you follow these five tips:
Warm Up. It's not enough to review your notecards and double-check your PowerPoint. Give yourself time to get your body and mind ready for peak performance.Relax. You've done all the prep work and you know what you're talking about, so give yourself permission to adapt to changes in your presentation as they occur.Adapt. You cannot plan for every question, and no matter how much you prepare there will always be uncontrollable surprises that pop up and potentially undermine your presentation. Don't try to control them. Try to adapt to them.Focus on Engaging. Put your energy into making sure that you are communicating your points clearly and effectively. You are not talking to a group; you are talking to individuals within the group.Be Yourself. You are not bound by slides. Your slides are ther…

Work Ethic For Leaders

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I really appreciate author Valerie M. Grubb's broader than typical definition of work ethic for leaders, as she details it in her book, Clash of the Generations.

Here is what she says defines work ethic for leaders:
Honest. Be truthful in your dealings with employees, vendors, customers, and anyone else with whom you come in contact on behalf of the company.Full of Integrity. Maintain high-quality standards despite schedule pressures. Demonstrate and uphold values and principles that create a climate of trust.Law-abiding. Act within the statutes of the law and the company's rules and regulations.Trustworthy. Speak the truth even when no one else does. Be candid and forthcoming. Give credit freely for others' accomplishments. Stand by your commitments and own up to your mistakes. Fair. Be fair and just in dealings with employees. Value and support diversity and inclusion across the board.Respectful of others. Display grace under pressure and don't lash out at employees,…

8 Seconds To Be Meaningful

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According to a 2015 Microsoft study, the average attention span for us ever-scattered humans is now shorter that a goldfish's; eight seconds. So, how do you stand out? How do you communicate effectively? How do you not waste time?


Paul Hellman answers these questions and gives you 100 fast and actionable tactics to make your eights seconds meaningful. It's all in his new book, You've Got 00:00:08 Seconds.

He teaches you three key ingredients:
Focus: How to say less with more meaning.Variety: How to stand out as slightly different.Presence. How to be notable and boost your reputation. Paul Hellman
His tactics will serve you well in all these types of situations:
Making presentationsInterviewingEmailingNetworkingStorytellingLeaving voice mail Here are some of my favorite takeaways from Hellman's book: In one-to-one conversations, talk less than the other person. Ask at least one thought-provoking question per conversation.In meetings, speak in 30-60 second bites. Provide the …

How To Be A Humble Leader

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From John Blakey's book, The Trusted Executive, here are these four tips from Jim Collins for how to be a humble leader:
Demonstrate a compelling modesty, shunning public adulation and never be boastful.Act with quiet, calm determination and motivate others through inspired standards, not inspiring charisma.Channel ambition into the company, not the self, and set up successors for even more greatness in the next generation.Look in the mirror, not out of the window, when apportioning responsibility for poor performance.

How To Create Your Mission Statement

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Here's some good "how-to" advice for creating your mission statement, from the book, Total Alignment. According to authors Riaz Khadem and Linda Khadem:

Basically, your mission statement includes:
What you doWhere you operateWhom you are servingWhy And, they explain that the first step in developing your mission is to ask and answer these key questions: What do we do?Where and for whom?Why do we do this? What is our purpose?Does what we do today limit us in fulfilling our purpose in five years or beyond?If so, how can we broaden the statement of what we do today?What would be a brief inspiring statement describing our mission?The answer to Question 6 is your mission statement.

How To Be An Effective Listener

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Here are some great tips from Michelle Tillis Lederman's book, The 11 Laws of Likability. They are all about:
what to do and what not to do to be a leader who's an effective listener:Do:
Maintain eye contactLimit your talkingFocus on the speakerAsk questionsManage your emotionsListen with your eyes and earsListen for ideas and opportunitiesRemain open to the conversationConfirm understanding, paraphraseGive nonverbal messages that you are listening (nod, smile)Ignore distractionsDon't:
InterruptShow signs of impatienceJudge or argue mentallyMultitask during a conversationProject your ideasThink about what to say nextHave expectations or preconceived ideasBecome defensive or assume you are being attackedUse condescending, aggressive, or closed body languageListen with biases or closed to new ideasJump to conclusions or finish someone's sentences

My Best Boss Did This

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In their book, Rapid Realignment, authors George Labovitz and Victor Rosansky, reveal the most common responses from thousands of managers and workers when they were asked to think of the best boss they ever had, and then answer the question:
"What did that person do to qualify as your best boss?" And, those most common responses were:
My best boss listened!My best boss backed me up.My best boss trusted me and respected me.My best boss gave me feedback.My best boss left me alone. What else would you add to this list?