Mentoring Tips From The Book, One Minute Mentoring


Fortunately, I've benefited from having great mentors throughout my career. And, I've have the honor and good fortune to be a mentor, both formally and informally, for various individuals the past few decades.

Mentoring is powerful. Both being a mentor. And, being mentored. That's why I became an instant fan of the book, One Minute Mentoring: How to Find and Work With a Mentor -- and Why You'll Benefit from Being One.

Released this in May, the book presents a fictional parable about the power of finding, or being, a mentor. In what is about a one- to two-hour read, you'll gain knowledge and easy-to-use tools for how to find and leverage mentoring relationships.



Ken Blanchard

You'll also learn why developing effective communication and relationships across generations through mentoring can be a tremendous opportunity for companies and individuals alike.

Bestselling author, Ken Blanchard, Ph.D. teamed up with Claire Diaz-Ortiz to write One Minute Mentoring. Blanchard coauthored the legendary, The One Minute Manager. Diaz-Ortiz is one of the first employees of Twitter, is an author, speaker, and businesswoman.


Claire Diaz-Oritiz

"Many people avoid mentoring because they think it takes a lot of time," says Blanchard. "It doesn't have to. Some of the best advice I ever received came from tidbits during casual conversations with my mentors," he adds.

Mentoring tips from the authors include:
  • Successful mentoring starts with a powerful mission statement. What do you hope to achieve with your partnership? Articulate your mission in a simple statement you can really call upon.
  • While mission statements focus on the mentee, both mentor and mentee will give and receive in the relationship. The mission statement should reflect this.
  • Keep a journal of your mentoring journey so that you can track your goals and progress.
Also, Blanchard stresses that there is a difference between mentoring and coaching:


  • Coaching is focused on short-term, task-related issues. Mentoring focuses on big-picture, long-term goals.
Further, mentoring often goes beyond coaching in that mentors serve as:
  • Brokers by making introductions to powerful, influential and otherwise useful individuals in the industry or organization.
  • Advocates for a mentee's work assignments or career development, to the help the mentee's growth and development
Finally, keep in mind that a mentor for one phase of your life may not be the person you need at another point.

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